Painting by Jacob Lawrence
The Migration Series, Panel 1 by Harlem Renaissance artist Jacob Lawrence, circa 1940. Lawrence used his art to educate people about African American history, and was heavily influenced by the tumultuous eras he lived in, including the Great Depression, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Great Migration.Dancers in a jazz club in Washington, D.C., ca. 1940.

Miami Dade College is proud to celebrate Black History Month 2019 with exciting concerts, movies, discussions, displays and presentations shining a light on Black Migrations.

The beginning of the 20th century in the United States saw a movement of blacks from the American South to the industrialized North and beyond. Such migrations, which largely included relocation from farms to cities, resulted in a more diverse urban population and a changing social milieu. The period also quickly gave rise to a growing number of black industrial leaders and entrepreneurs, as well as new urban churches, religions and music genres like ragtime, blues and jazz.

But not everyone headed north. Many black migrants from North Florida and numerous Southern states settled in Miami. Black immigrants also arrived in Miami from the Bahamas, Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados and other countries throughout the Western Hemisphere. As early as 1904, the official City of Miami directory listed numerous black-owned and -operated businesses, as well as a medical doctor, 26 laundresses and several hundred laborers. By 1915, the black population in Miami was approximately 5,000, and their holdings in real estate and personal property were estimated at $800,000.

Don’t miss the wide variety of events available collegewide in honor of black history. From Redlining: Then and Now, an insightful discussion on land distribution throughout history, to Healthy Soul Food, a food demonstration exploring the origins of popular African-American, Caribbean and Southern cuisine, MDC students can participate in an abundance of festivities happening at each campus.

View Moments in Black History | View Upcoming Events

Moments in Black History

Group of black migrants leaving Florida

A group of black migrants travel from Florida to Cranberry, N.J. in the summer of 1940.

The Great Migration fundamentally altered the U.S. landscape. During the span of roughly two decades in the early 20th century, millions of African-Americans fled from the segregation and violence of the American South in search of stability and relative economic prosperity of northern and western cities.

Learn more: https://www.accessgenealogy.com/black-genealogy/a-century-of-black-migration.htm

the great migration family of chicago

A southern family arrives in Chicago during World War I. Learn

Between 1910 and 1970, roughly 6 million African-Americans left the Deep South for places like New York, Chicago, Washington, D.C., and other northern cities.

Learn more: http://depts.washington.edu/moving1/black_migration.shtml

The 10th Harlem Renaissance community

The 10th Harlem Renaissance community

A century ago, Harlem, a small neighborhood in upper Manhattan, was the epicenter of black culture. Home to the first generation of blacks not largely born as slaves, Harlem was a destination of progress. Legendary figures like Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes launched their literary careers in Harlem. So did musicians Louis Armstrong and Billie Holiday.

Learn more: https://atlantablackstar.com/2015/02/05/harlem-becomes-whiter-blacks-hold-memories-harlem-renaissance/

Photo taken from the collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History

A snapshot from the collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

Between the end of World War I and the mid-1930s, the people of Harlem produced one of the most significant eras of cultural expression in the nation’s history — the Harlem Renaissance – encompassing poetry and prose, painting and sculpture, jazz and swing, opera and dance.

Learn more: https://nmaahc.si.edu/blog-post/new-african-american-identity-harlem-renaissance

black community of Coconut Grove in the 1890s.

The black community of Coconut Grove gathered together in front of Commodore Ralph M. Munroe’s boathouse in the 1890s.

Long before Julia Tuttle and Henry Flagler ever set foot at the mouth of the Miami River, pioneers, both black and white, had been settling in Miami. The area’s first black settlers came from the Bahamas to assist in the building of the Peacock Inn in Coconut Grove, known at the time as the Bay View Inn.

Learn more: https://thenewtropic.com/black-history-early-miami/

>Bahamian migrants working in Florida

Bahamian migrants selling pineapples and working in Florida

Records show that Bahamians began migrating to Florida as early as 1890 for seasonal agricultural work. At one point, the exodus to Florida was so great that, from 1900 to 1920, one fifth of the Bahamian population went to Florida.

Learn more: http://everydaybahamians.mozello.com/news/params/post/1104379/

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