Volume 3, Number 14 - April 23, 2013

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Jonathan Muñoz


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Beyoncé and Jay-Z Take Cuba, Legally?

By Jonathan Muñoz
Jonathan.munoz004@mymdc.net

Turns out that the trip to Cuba was legal after all.

When word broke out that Beyoncé and Jay-Z were in Cuba, everyone frantically wanted to know if they had broken any laws, due to the tight restrictions placed on Americans going to visit the island.

All the fuss has to do with the embargo that was placed on Cuba decades ago that restricts economic activity with the island, which includes tourism.

But what most people don’t realize is that the communist country has used the embargo to it’s advantage (as strange as that sounds).

The Castro brothers have successfully been able to blame all the woes and miseries of the Cuban people on the restriction United States placed on them.

That has only caused animosity toward the U.S. and hasn’t helped our relationship with Cuba whatsoever.

Trade is the only way that Cuba will move from communism. Shutting Cuba off from our products and our people will only keep them shutout of our ways and customs.

Take China for example, it’s a communist country that we have opened trade with. You can see McDonald's and Coca-Cola in that country.

In Coke’s case, what you have there is nothing less than sweet, refreshing and addictive capitalism.

The U.S. has a unique trading policy with the rest of the world in that when we trade with other countries and set up our corporation’s franchises around the world we do more than just export products, we also export culture.

I guarantee you that if we opened up trade with Cuba we would see an influx of investments and corporations setting up shops and business’ in Cuba.

Little by little, people will see that capitalism is a much better alternative than communism and from there we can start changing the minds of the Cuban people, just as we have started changing the minds of the Chinese.

We already know from the Cold War that the best way to bring down a communist state is to flood it with affluent tourists so the natives can see what life is like outside of their own country.

If we can show a better alternative to their lifestyle and show them that it’s not the fault of the embargo we can turn Cuba around.

By isolating Cubans from the lifestyle available to those who live only 90 miles away we have helped the Castros stay in power for more than 60 years.

Prominent Miami and Florida politicians have voiced their concerns over the legal visa that was awarded to Beyoncé and Jay-Z.

Cuban-American Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen slammed the Obama administration, once again, for changing travel policy to allow educational trips like Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s to get approved.

The Miami Herald  reported her saying this, “If the tourist activities undertaken by Beyoncé and Jay-Z in Cuba are classified as an educational exchange trip, then it is clear that the Obama administration is not serious about denying the Castro regime an economic lifeline that U.S. tourism will extend to it. That was a wedding anniversary vacation that was not even disguised as a cultural program.”

But then again, that’s what this whole thing is about. Someone tell me one good reason why we should continue the embargo against Cuba if not for political reason.

If not for how our electoral college is set up, making Florida a swing state, won by a very small margin, making any significant voting block (including those Cuban-Americans that believe the embargo is still a good thing), one that candidates must pander too if they wish to win.


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