Miami Dade College

Virtual College

Pre-Bachelor of Arts

Overview

The Pre-Bachelor of Arts program at MDC is designed for students who seek a general degree program and greater freedom to explore intellectual fields of their particular interest. This program challenges students to assume major responsibility for the direction of their own education. The program also provides a broader range of educational opportunities than in specialized programs. At the upper division, a major theme or area of concentration is usually required.

The areas of concentration parallel university coursework and prepare students to enter the junior year at four-year upper-division institutions. Students who have already earned a Baccalaureate degree will not be awarded an Associate in Arts degree.

Please note that some of the courses in this program have a Gordon Rule writing requirement.

General Education Requirements

  1. Communications (6.00 credits)

    This is the first required general core course in college-level writing. The student will learn to compose essays and other works using various methods of development. Prerequisites: The grade of 'S' in ENC0025 and/or REA0017 or appropriate placement test score. (3 hr. lecture)

    This is the second required general education core course in college-level writing. Students will learn the conventions of standard edited American English. Students will compose informative and persuasive essays, write responses to a variety of literary genres, and/or non-fiction, and produce a documented paper based on research. Prerequisite: ENC1101. (3 hr. lecture)
  2. Oral Communications (3.00 Credits)

    Students should select the appropriate course.

    This writing-based course addresses techniques of critical thinking, persuasion, and argumentation. Students will refine their composition skills and develop their oral communication skills by examing and discussing a range of issues. Prerequisites: ENC1101, 1102 or equivalent with a grade of "C" or better. (3 hr. lecture)

    LIT2480 explores literature as a form of cultural expression. Students are engaged in the critical process of analysis by connecting literary texts to cultural issues. Through oral and written assignments, and practical investigation, students will study literature as a socio-cultural response by writers to the world in which they live. (3 hr. lecture)

    This course provides students with the oral communications skills necessary for success in personal, professional and educational settings. Students will learn through the study and experiential practice of interpersonal communication, presentational speaking and group dynamics of communication and be able to use them effectively. (3 hr. lecture)
  3. Humanities (6.00 credits)

    Must take 3.0 credits from the following group:

    An integral approach to the humanities: creative ideas, works, and accomplishments of various cultures from the areas of art, architecture, drama, music, literature and philosophy are presented. (3 hr. lecture)

    Acquaints the student with period styles in room decoration from Egyptian through the Renaissance. (3 hr. lecture)

    The development of the various styles, forms, and idioms, in music. The emphasis is given to the student's ability to understand and enjoy music. (3 hr. lecture)

    This is a foundation course in philosophy. Students will learn critical thinking skills and will study major theories of ethics. Students will use methods of effective reasoning to reflect critically upon their values, ethical standards, and the ethical permissibility of topics such as euthanasia, animal rights, and environmental ethics. Prerequisite. ENC1101 (3 hr. lecture)

    The following courses are for "Majors Only" and require departmental permission:

    IND1100 - Interior Design majors only;

    And

    Must take 3.0 credits from the following group:

    LIT2120 explores masterpieces of world literature from the mid-renaissance to the present. Works studied exemplify the universality of human experience. Prerequisites: ENC 1101,1102 or equivalent. (3 hr. lecture)

    A survey of the development of popular and jazz music with an emphasis on musical styles and outstanding artists. (3 hr. lecture)

    This is a foundation course in philosophy. Students will learn about topics such as epistemology, metaphysics and ethics. The course introduces the methods of philosophy, addresses some major philosophical questions and examines the views of various philosophers from around the world. Prerequisite: ENC1101. (3 hr. lecture)
  4. Behavioral/Social Science (6.00 Credits)

    Must take 3.0 credits from the following group:

    This is an applied psychology course which emphasizes understanding of the principles of effective human behavior and applying these to the areas of personal awareness, interpersonal relations, communication, and work/career development. Students will learn strategies to apply these principles in both their personal and professional lives. (3 hr. lecture)

    This course examines the physical, cognitive, social and emotional development of human beings from conception to death. Students will learn about theories of development, key issues in the field and apply research in developmental psychology throughout the prenatal, infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood periods of the lifespan. (3 hr. lecture)

    This is an interdisciplinary course that emphasizes understanding of oneself as a unique individual who, as part of global community, is responsible for decisions affecting his/her psychological, social, environmental, and physical well-being. Main themes include personality and self, society and culture, development and the life cycle, and the maintenance of physical and psychological health. (3hr. lecture)

    This course engages in a scientific study of society providing an overview of sociology as a social science. It includes its development as a discipline and methodology. It examines culture as a basis for human behavior, how it is acquired and its norms obeyed. It explores the issues of social inequality within society, including the issues of ethnicity and gender. The issues of social change and social institutions are examined, along with those of demography and urbanization, together with the great challenges these currently pose to the modern world. (3 hr. lecture)
    And

    Must take 3.0 credits from the following group:

    Students will learn of the history of the United States to 1877 by examining the founding, growth, and development of America from the colonial era through Reconstruction. (3 hr. lecture)

    This course focuses on the social, economic, cultural, and political developments in the United States since 1877. The student will gain knowledge of changes and continuities in the history of the United States since the late nineteenth century. (3 hr. lecture)

    An overview of the basic economic concepts and institutions. Students will learn the modern national income formation theory, economic fluctuations, money, banking, monetary and fiscal policy, economic stabilization theory and policy, the public sector, theory of economic growth and development comparative economic systems. (3 hr. lecture)

    The Social Environment is an interdisciplinary course that emphasizes the cultural, political, economic and global dimensions of societies. Its main objective is to promote knowledge of contemporary and historical forces that shape our social environment and engage students in a life-long process of inquiry and decision-making. (3 hr. lecture)

    The American Constitution and its development, the organization and functions of the national government, political parties and the electoral process, and the relationship of the individual to the federal government. (3 hr. lecture)

    This course covers the history of World Civilizations from the prehistoric period to the 18th century. Students will learn the major political, social, economic, and cultural structures of civilizations and their development through 1789. (3 hr. lecture)

    Students must take 3 credits from Group A and 3 credits from Group B. If a 1000 level course is selected from one group, a 2000 level course must be selected from the other group.

  5. Natural Science (6.00 Credits)

    Must take 3.0 credits from the following group.

    This general education biology course covers basic biological concepts, concentrating on selected principles that help explain molecular biology, evolution, genetics, growth, disease, and the problems of humans in the environment. It is designed to stimulate interest in the variety of life that exists on our planet, help students recognize the factors that provide order in this variety, and involve students in the processes of inquiry, observation, and analysis of biological organization in order to give them a foundation for intelligently interpreting and evaluating biological topics. (3 hr. lecture)

    This course provides students with an understanding and appreciation of how the natural world functions, how human attitudes and actions alter nature systems, creating environmental problems, and how sustainable approaches may resolve these problems. (3 hr. lecture)

    This is the first sequence of two courses that deal with the principles of modern biology. It covers scientific process, the chemistry of life, the basics of metabolism, cell theory, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, classical, and molecular genetics. Pre/corequisites: BSC2010L, CHM1045. (3 hr. lecture)

    The structure and functions of the systems of the human body, emphasizing those aspects most pertinent to students in the nursing and allied health technology programs. Students are strongly recommended to complete CHM1033/1033L prior to taking BSC2085/2085L. Corequisite: BSC2085L. (3hr. lecture)

    The Essentials of Human Nutrition is a general education course designed to acquaint students with the specific role of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and water in daily life. Students will learn how the human body systems manage the breakdown, assimilation, and excretion of nutrients and their metabolic wastes. Students will also learn the relationships between food and optimal health including physical fitness and the relationships between nutritional imbalances and diseases. (3 hr. lecture)
    And

    Must take 3.0 credits from the following group:

    The oceans, their nature and extent. The causes and effects of waves and current; biology of sea life; geology of the sea floor, erosion and bottom deposits and related meteorological and economic effects. (3 hr. lecture)

    This course will help students to facilitate the transition from high school to college/university physics. The course will emphasize problem-solving techniques. Topics may include units of measure, particle mechanics, conservation laws, and basic field concepts. Prerequisite: MAC1105. (3 hr. lecture)

    A study of the major concepts and principles from each of the following areas: physics, chemistry, and astronomy. Prerequisite: MAT1033. (3 hr. lecture)

    Investigation of the physical environment using energy as a theme to demonstrate the impact of science and technology on the environment and on the lives of people. (3 hr. lecture)

    The following course(s) are not allowed for credit in this area: All Labs.

  6. Mathematics (6.00 credits)

    This course introduces the student to the concept of functions and their graphs. Students will graph linear, quadratic, rational, exponential, logarithmic, radical, power, and absolute value functions and transformations; perform operations on and compositions of functions; find the inverse of a function; apply the laws of logarithms to simplify expressions and solve equations; graph non-linear inequalities; solve related applications and modeling problems. Prerequisite: MAT1033 with a grade of "C" or better "or" satisfactory placement test scores. Special Fee. (3 hr. lecture)

    This course is primarily designed for students who expect to take physics and/or the courses in the calculus sequence. Students will learn and use the fundamental trigonometric identities and solve conditional trigonometric equations, perform operations on complex numbers in trigonometric form, work with vectors, and graph both polar and parametric equations. Prerequisite: MAC1105 or MAC1140 or MAD2104 with a grade of "C" or better. Special fee. (3 hr. lecture)

    This course includes topics in geometry, probability and statistics, and sets and logic. It also covers selected topics in the history of mathematics. Prerequisite: MAT1033. (3 hr. lecture)

    The application of basic statistical methods to business problems. Emphasis is on learning to select the appropriate statistical method of solving a given business problem, applying the chosen method, and interpreting the solution. Prerequisite: Acceptable score on the Algebra Placement test or equivalent; Corequisite: QMB2100L. (3 hr. lecture)

    This course will introduce students to statistical methods. Students will learn topics to include collecting, grouping and presenting; measures of central tendency and dispersion; probability; testing hypotheses; confidence intervals; and correlation. Prerequisite: MAT1033. Special fee. (3 hr. lecture)

    The following course(s) are not allowed for credit in this area: All Labs.

  7. General Education Elective (3.00 credits)

    An introduction to financial accounting concepts and analysis with emphasis on corporate financial statements and determination of income. Corequisite: ACG2021L. (3 hr. lecture)

    Students will learn of the history of the United States to 1877 by examining the founding, growth, and development of America from the colonial era through Reconstruction. (3 hr. lecture)

    This course focuses on the social, economic, cultural, and political developments in the United States since 1877. The student will gain knowledge of changes and continuities in the history of the United States since the late nineteenth century. (3 hr. lecture)

    This is an introductory level course that satisfies the College's computer competency requirement. Students will learn essential computer concepts and skills as well as knowledge of how to use, current software applications. Topics include word processing, spreadsheets, database, presentation software, email, Internet, and legal and ethical issues concerning the use of computers and the Internet. (3 hr. lecture; 2 hr. lab)

    This is an applied psychology course which emphasizes understanding of the principles of effective human behavior and applying these to the areas of personal awareness, interpersonal relations, communication, and work/career development. Students will learn strategies to apply these principles in both their personal and professional lives. (3 hr. lecture)

    This course introduces computer science and non-major students to fundamental programming skills using the Visual Basic Integrated Development environment. Students will learn program design, the fundamentals of event driven object-oriented programming, arrays, validation of user input, and how to create menu driven programs and multiple form applications. Pre/Co-requisite: CGS1060. Knowledge of high school algebra is recommended. (3 hr. lecture; 2 hr. lab)

    This is an introductory course in C++ programming recommended for Computer Science and Computer Information Systems majors. Students will learn the syntax and rules of the C++ language, including how to code, compile, and execute programs. Students study program design, structured modular programming arrays, report generation, and file processing.Pre/corequisite: CGS1060. (3 hr. lecture; 2 hr. lab)

    This course examines the physical, cognitive, social and emotional development of human beings from conception to death. Students will learn about theories of development, key issues in the field and apply research in developmental psychology throughout the prenatal, infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood periods of the lifespan. (3 hr. lecture)

    An overview of the basic economic concepts and institutions. Students will learn the modern national income formation theory, economic fluctuations, money, banking, monetary and fiscal policy, economic stabilization theory and policy, the public sector, theory of economic growth and development comparative economic systems. (3 hr. lecture)

    This course provides the opportunity to explore issues of diversity, including an understanding of the influence of exceptionalities, culture, family, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, religion, language of origin, ethnicity, and age upon the educational experience. Students will learn to explore personal attitudes toward diversity and exceptionalities. Students will also learn the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices, Sunshine State Standards, and the Professional Educator Competencies. Fifteen hours of field experience are required. (3 hr. lecture)

    In this course students will learn the roles of exercise, physical activity, diet, and stress management in achieving optimal wellness. Students will explore current developments in health and complete lab assignments, which will assist in the determination of their current health status. Individualized exercise and dietary protocols based on these assessments will be developed. (3 hr. lecture/lab)

    Designed to provide opportunities to develop, practice, and display skills concerning emergency care and the prevention of accidents. This course meets the American Heart Association Healthcare Provider Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/automated External Defibrillation and the American Red Cross for Standard First Aid Certification requirement. (3 hr. lecture)

    An integral approach to the humanities: creative ideas, works, and accomplishments of various cultures from the areas of art, architecture, drama, music, literature and philosophy are presented. (3 hr. lecture)

    The Essentials of Human Nutrition is a general education course designed to acquaint students with the specific role of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and water in daily life. Students will learn how the human body systems managethe breakdown, assimilation, and excretion of nutrients and their metabolic wastes. Students will also learn the relationships between food and optimal health including physical fitness and the relationships between nutritional imbalances and diseases. (3 hr. lecture)

    Acquaints the student with period styles in room decoration from Egyptian through the Renaissance. (3 hr. lecture)

    The nature of international relations, the causesof leading international problems, foreign policies of world powers, international political organizations, and the origins of war and peace in the international arena. (3 hr. lecture)

    The Social Environment is an interdisciplinary course that emphasizes the cultural, political, economic and global dimensions of societies. Its main objective is to promote knowledge of contemporary and historical forces that shape our social environment and engage students in a life-long process of inquiry and decision-making. (3 hr. lecture)

    LIT2120 explores masterpieces of world literature from the mid-renaissance to the present. Works studied exemplify the universality of human experience. Prerequisites: ENC1101,1102 or equivalent. (3 hr. lecture)

    LIT2480 explores literature as a form of cultural expression. Students are engaged in the critical process of analysis by connecting literary texts to cultural issues. Through oral and written assignments, and practical investigation, students will study literature as a socio-cultural response by writers to the world in which they live. (3 hr. lecture)

    The development of the various styles, forms, andidioms, in music. The emphasis is given to the student's ability to understand and enjoy music. (3 hr. lecture)

    A survey of the development of popular and jazz music with an emphasis on musical styles and outstanding artists. (3 hr. lecture)

    This is a foundation course in philosophy. Students will learn about topics such as epistemology, metaphysics and ethics. The course introduces the methods of philosophy, addresses some major philosophical questions and examines the views of various philosophers from around the world. Prerequisite: ENC1101. (3 hr. lecture)

    This is a foundation course in philosophy. Students will learn critical thinking skills and will study major theories of ethics. Students will use methods of effective reasoning to reflect critically upon their values, ethical standards, and the ethical permissibility of topics such as euthanasia, animal rights, and environmental ethics. Prerequisite: ENC1101 (3 hr. lecture)

    The American Constitution and its development, the organization and functions of the national government, political parties and the electoral process, and the relationship of the individual to the federal government. (3 hr. lecture)

    The typical state and local government organization, together with political practices in America, with special emphasis on the governmental organization and the major contemporary political problems of the State of Florida and of Florida communities. (3 hr. lecture)

    This course provides an overview of the field of psychology. Students will learn about the biological and environmental bases of behavior, and theories and concepts in such areas as personality, intelligence, learning, motivation, emotions and mental illness. Students will increase their knowledge about the brain-body connection and applied neurosciences. (3 hr. lecture)

    A survey of the origins, beliefs and contemporary practices of the world's religions: Hinduism, Islam, Taoism, Zen Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Confucianism. Attention is given to the interactions between specific religions and the cultures in which they are practiced. (3 hr. lecture)

    This course provides students with the oral communications skills necessary for success in personal, professional and educational settings. Students will learn through the study and experiential practice of interpersonal communication, presentational speaking and group dynamics of communication and be able to use them effectively. (3 hr. lecture)

    This course engages in a scientific study of society providing an overview of sociology as a social science. It includes its development as a discipline and methodology. It examines culture as a basis for human behavior, how it is acquired and its norms obeyed. It explores the issues of social inequality within society, including the issues of ethnicity and gender. The issues of social change and social institutions are examined, along with those of demography and urbanization, together with the great challenges these currently pose to the modern world. (3 hr. lecture)

    An introduction to the theory and problems of minority groups in American society. The focus is on structural inequality, institutional discrimination, and the changing patterns of prejudice and discrimination. (3 hr. lecture)

    This course covers the history of World Civilizations from the prehistoric period to the 18th century. Students will learn the major political, social, economic, and cultural structures of civilizations and their development through 1789. (3 hr. lecture)

  8. Computer Competency

    Test type(s) needed:

    This is an introductory level course that satisfies the College's computer competency requirement. Students will learn essential computer concepts and skills as well as knowledge of how to use, current software applications. Topics include word processing, spreadsheets, database, presentation software, email, Internet, and legal and ethical issuesconcerning the use of computers and the Internet. (3 hr. lecture; 2 hr. lab)
  9. Electives (24.00 Credits Required)

    Courses that are not used for General Education Requirements may be used in the Electives Block. Students are encouraged to check with their advisor for appropriate "pathways to a major" or go to www.FLVC.org for transfer information.

    ACG2001, 2001L, 2011, 2011L, 2021, 2021L, 2031, 2071, 2071L, 2450, AMH,

    CCJ, CGS1060, CJC1000, 1162, CJL2062, CLP,

    DEP, ECO, EDF, EEC, EME, ENC, FIN2100, GEB1011, 2112, 2350,

    HFT1000, 1210, 2500, 2800, HLP1081, HSC2400, HUM, HUN, IND1100, ISS1120, 1161,

    LIS, LIT, MAC, MAN2021, MAR1011, 1720, 2150, MAT1033, MCB, MGF, MUL, MUM2704,

    OCE, OST2335, PHI, PHY, POS, PSC, PSY, PUR, QMB,

    REL, SLS1505, 1510, STA, SYG, WOH

Not all courses are offered every term. Please refer to our online schedule of courses each term for listed offerings.