November 2009, Volume 13, Number 8

Features

Dr. Mark B. Rosenberg, Carol Coletta, Dr. Eduardo J. Padrón, Manny Díaz, Alberto M. Carvalho
Dr. Mark B. Rosenberg, president of Florida International University; Carol Coletta, president and chief executive officer of CEOs for Cities; Dr. Eduardo J. Padrón, president of Miami Dade College; Manny Díaz, Miami mayor; Alberto M. Carvalho, superintendent of Miami-Dade County Public Schools

Degrees equal dollars for Miami economy

If Miami’s leading educational institutions can work together and increase the number of college graduates with baccalaureate degrees in the city by one percentage point – or 16,000 more graduates – the result would be $1.7 billion in aggregate personal income for the metro area each year.

That equation, part of what’s called the “talent dividend,” was the focus of a recent meeting of three-dozen leaders in government, business, civic life and academia at Miami Dade College. MDC President Dr. Eduardo J. Padrón hosted the invitational event with FIU President Dr. Mark Rosenberg, Miami Mayor Manny Díaz and Miami-Dade Schools Superintendent Alberto M. Carvalho.

The gathering served to familiarize leaders with a national initiative of CEOs for Cities to increase the “talent dividend” in 50 key cities throughout the U.S.

CEOs for Cities is a national network of urban leaders dedicated to building and sustaining the next generation of great American cities. Carol Coletta, the president and CEO, said the group would like to couple the talent dividend with the “green dividend,” an aggregate decrease in travel by one mile, and the “opportunity dividend,” decrease the poverty rate by one percentage points.

“If we could make these three modest improvements in performance in the top 50 metro areas, this translates to a $166 billion value, annually,” Coletta said.

In his introductory remarks, Padrón said the meeting was organized to work toward viable solutions for the region. “As institutions of higher education, we need to work toward a common goal,” he said.

“We can’t do it alone,” Padrón said. “It takes a village. In two hours, I think we can take important steps.”

— Gariot P. Louima


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Miami Dade College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award associate and baccalaureate degrees.
Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Miami Dade College.
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