EDUCATION REVIEW:

PLANNING FOR STUDENT SUCCESS

Final Report

Purpose

In 1995, Miami Dade Community College completed a comprehensive self study of the institution as a requirement for reaccreditation from the Southern Association of Schools and Colleges. One of the outcomes of the self study was a new vision statement that re-confirmed the College's commitment to providing accessible, affordable and high quality education by keeping the learner's needs at the center of decision making. The new statement provided the direction for launching a major educational review of all aspects of the College operations which directly "touch" students: the curriculum areas of General Education, Transfer and Occupational Education and the student support functions of recruitment, admission and registration, advisement and counseling, financial aid, assessment, retention and graduation, transfer and job placement.

Organization

Three task forces working under the direction of Collegewide Steering Committee were appointed by Dr. Padrón in April 1996 and charged with addressing the major goals of the project:

  1. The Transfer Preparation Task Force was charged with determining the abilities and skills that all Associate in Arts degree students must be able to perform in order to transfer to an upper division program The abilities and skills identified determined the 36 hour general education requirement.

  2. The Occupational Task Force was charged with determining the abilities and skills that all Associate in Science degree students must be able to perform in preparing their careers. The abilities and skills identified determined the 15 hour general education requirement.

  3. The Student Flow Task Force was charged with determining what student services should be provided and how services should be delivered to Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, Vocational, Supplemental and Continuing Education students.

Transfer Task Force

The Transfer Task Force gathered information from current and former students, upper division faculty and our own faculty through DACUMs, focus groups, surveys, town meetings, and Conference Day. Participants offered their views concerning the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for students to be successful at the upper division and eventually in the marketplace. Task Force members facilitated all of the activities, including sessions held with former students and faculty at institutions around the state.

Information from the data gathering sessions was incorporated into a survey that was sent to all MDC faculty. The response rate to the surveys was approximately 25%. Items considered important for students to know by 70% of the respondents were included by the Task Force in their recommendations.

An analysis of the data collected revealed several prominent themes. Foremost was communication skills, both written and oral, with attention to applications such as technical writing, oral dialogue and presentation skills, and research. Critical thinking and reasoning skills and the ability to apply technology, especially basic computer skills, were also emphasized. Interpersonal skills and an appreciation for and ability to work within a multicultural setting were also of concern. And finally, an array of skills that might be termed self management skills were identified.

In addition to recommendations for specific courses to be included in the general education requirement, the Task Force also recommended that writing, oral communication, cross cultural issues and critical thinking be addressed across the curriculum.

Occupational Task Force

The Occupational Task Force began its work by collecting information through brainstorming sessions called DACUMS and Focus Groups. Twelve DACUMS and eleven Focus Groups were completed. The DACUMS were whole day sessions and the Focus Groups were half day meetings of a less formal nature. Current students, graduates, faculty, and people from different occupations in the local business community were the participants. They offered their views concerning what knowledge, attitudes, and skills employers required for a graduate to be successful at an entry level job in the local marketplace. One task force member served as an impartial facilitator during the meetings while a second acted as recorder to capture the ideas.

Information obtained from the meetings was incorporated in a survey which was sent to all persons at the college, who were identified as full-time faculty teaching in an A.S. Degree program. Seventy-two of the one hundred sixty-eight persons surveyed provided a response indicating a forty-two percent return. In the survey, faculty rated the relative importance of the items identified as relevant for student success.

An analysis of the data collected from all sources revealed several predominant themes.

Many students and employers are not aware of the differences between A.S. and A.A. Degree programs. For example, they do not realize that one is articulated and the other is not. A number of students in A.S. programs aspire to transfer after graduation. Some plan to attend private universities which do not require either the A.A. Degree or CLAST. Still others seek to complete the A.A. Degree en route to the state university system. These considerations indicate that a flexible general education core with bridges between the two degrees is in the best interest of students.

Employers favored a broad educational foundation as long as it was relevant to the skill areas which they felt were necessary. Most employers wanted to train graduates on the job. Current technology becomes obsolete so rapidly that employees have to be able to learn continuously in the workplace as new technology evolves. Employers suggested that the curriculum should impart knowledge and skills which are transferable to new endeavors that would include the process of learning on the job.

Although the participants had expectations for graduates which varied according to the workplace, there was general agreement as to the fundamental knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for success. The Task Force found that graduates should be able to:

Student Flow Task Force

In May 1996, Planning for Student Success was initiated to refashion the student flow process to fulfill the mission and vision statements of the College and to respond to changing external and internal forces. The Student Flow Task Force was charged with determining what and how student services should be provided for student success.

The Student Flow Task Force began its work by reviewing and developing sixteen flow charts of student services at the College. The charts were distributed to over 60 College staff members and were revised based upon their feedback.

From June to November 1996, the Task Force independently and jointly with the Transfer and Occupational Task Forces conducted DACUMs (one-day sessions) and Focus Groups (half-day sessions) to brainstorm the knowledge, skills, attitudes and tasks of successful students. Current and former students, MDC faculty, university faculty, and business and industry participated. In the DACUMs and Focus Groups held by the Student Flow Task Force, participants were also requested to cite recommendations for how the College should improve its student services. All of these recommendations were placed under each essential, chronological student services step of the successful MDC student identified in a November DACUM by student services personnel.

In January 1997, this information was incorporated in a survey and distributed to all student services personnel, 30% of other personnel, and a representative 5.6% sample of classes. Thirty-three percent (233 of 707) of the staff sampled and 20% (667 of 3,304) of the students sampled returned the survey. There was remarkable consistency among the students and staff with 66 of the 69 steps receiving over 70% agreement and 54 steps receiving 80 - 90% agreement as essential for the successful MDC student.

The Task Force attended Town Hall and committee meetings to provide progress reports and obtain feedback. Members also reviewed considerable data, different studies, best practices, association guidelines, policies and procedures, and federal/state rules and regulations. An analysis of the data revealed several prominent themes which were incorporated into Guiding Principles and distributed in January 1997 to all College personnel for feedback:

  1. Student Services should be learner-centered.

  2. Student Services should encourage student self-reliance, responsibility and leadership.

  3. Student Services should encourage student retention and goal completion by minimizing internal and external barriers to student success.

  4. Student Services should be consistent and integrated with each other and with the instructional process.

  5. Student Services must adapt to internal and external environmental changes.

  6. Student Services should have the resources and sufficient, qualified personnel to enable students, staff and programs to flourish.

Student Services Response Teams, consisting of faculty and staff, worked in January and February to draft models and recommendations in four areas: Intake, Advisement/Registration, Retention, and Transition. The results of the response teams are woven throughout the major preliminary recommendations and are included in the final report (See Table 1) which will be made available in campus libraries. These reports contain additional recommendations and implementation considerations.

Task Force Recommendations

The recommendations conceived by the Transfer, Occupational and Student Flow Task Forces were submitted to the Student Services and Academic Affairs Committees for approval. The faculty senates and departments were invited to submit amendments to the task forces' recommendations. As each amendment was considered, the College Community was asked to speak to the amendment. Following the third day of deliberations, the basic work of the task forces were confirmed, some amending had been done and the Academic Affairs and Student Services Committees had voted to approve the reports. (See Tables 2 and 3 for a summary of the recommendations.)

When the amended reports were submitted to the President Council, faculty, staff, students and administrators addressed the issues of student needs and interests, the Southern Association Criteria for associate degree programs, the demands of the legislature, faculty concerns about pedagogy and the impact of these changes on the institution. The outcome of the session resulted in general education criteria and student flow processes that:

The recommendations will be implemented Fall Term 1998. During the next academic year the President's Council, Academic Affairs and Students Services Committees will be addressing the many issues associated with implementation.

T A B L E 1

Student Flow Goals

(as approved by the President's Council 4/16/97)
Goal I: Develop a comprehensive, coordinated recruitment/marketing and follow up plan using current technology and alternate methods targeted to specific MDC audiences.
Goal II: Develop a customer-friendly climate on campuses to serve new and potential students.
Goal III: Provide coordinated pre-admission information and guidance about all educational paths at MDC (AA, AS, Vocational Credit Certificate, Credit Certificate) to assist students to make an early, informed initial decision about their education at MDC.
Goal IV: Improve the financial aid process through uniform procedures, expanded student education, technology, and user-friendly procedures and staff.
Goal V: Improve the initial placement of students by providing an orientation to placement tests, by providing career assessment, by determining the correlation of entrance tests with course placement/success, and by conducting more precise ESL and college prep screening.
Goal VI: Create a coordinated advisement system including all educational paths at MDC (AA, AS, Vocational Credit Certificate, Credit Certificate, Non-Credit ) which involves more faculty and students across the curriculum and is supported by accurate information, technology and training.
Goal VII: Establish accessible, uniform, electronic enrollment management procedures that incorporate deadlines, current technology, and improved policies regarding cancelled classes, purging of class rolls, and processing of grades to promote individual responsibility, early advisement and registration.
Goal VIII: Coordinate student retention efforts through college-wide coordination, coordination at each campus, and the development of alternate standards of success that recognize the needs and accomplishments of our diverse student body.
Goal IX: Develop student retention plans in all College departments which include alternate delivery/ intervention strategies and student support systems as student life programming integrated with the instructional process.
Goal X: Collect systematic data that determine the effectiveness of existing retention programs, Facilitate the design and evaluation of new retention programs, and monitor students from pre-Admission to goal completion.
Goal XI: Provide a coordinated process which facilitates the transition of students through opportunities such as career planning, job placement, cooperative work-education, internships, service learning and university transfer-preparation from intake to their desired academic and career goals.
Goal XII: Develop processes which facilitate the coordination, leadership, accountability, and organization of student services through communication, review, annual college-wide/campus goals, implementation of priorities, systematic data collection, and evaluation by constituents with change based upon findings.
Goal XIII: Recognize the value of student services personnel and provide for their professional growth and development.
Goal XIV: Develop student services delivery systems with on-line, accessible, accurate, integrated information for students and College staff.
NOTE: Student Flow Task Force recommended strategies as amended were approved as guidelines for implementation of goals.


T A B L E 2

EDUCATION REVIEW

OCCUPATIONAL CORE
1996-97

OCCUPATIONAL
TASK FORCE
AAC
RECOMMENDATIONS
ISSUES

PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL
RECOMMENDATIONS

BOARD
APPROVED
REQUIREMENTS

Communications:

(3 credits)

ENC 1101

 

Communications:

(3 credits)

ENC 1101

Note 1: ENC 1101 should include a required lab component which provides additional instruction and practice geared to promote skill development in grammar, punctuation, and coherence in writing.

 

Note 2: ENC 1101 should be revised to include some instruction on how to write a memorandum and a letter. Application of this knowledge should be required.

Communications:

(3 credits)

ENC 1101

 

Communications:

(3 credits)

ENC 1101

 

Communications:

(3 credits)

ENC 1101

 

OCCUPATIONAL CORE
1996-97

OCCUPATIONAL
TASK FORCE
AAC
RECOMMENDATIONS
ISSUES

PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL
RECOMMENDATIONS

BOARD
APPROVED
REQUIREMENTS

Oral Communications:

Included in ENC 1101

Oral Communications: 

(3 credits)

 

SPC 2600

Oral Communications: 

(3 credits)

 

SPC XXXX

Training of faculty to meet SACS criteria willbe required.

 

Oral Communications:

(3 credits)

 

SPC XXXX

 

Oral Communications:

(3 credits)

 

SPC XXXX

OCCUPATIONAL CORE 1996-97
OCCUPATIONAL TASK FORCE
AAC
RECOMMENDATIONS
ISSUES

PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL RECOMMENDATIONS

BOARD APPROVED REQUIREMENTS

Humanities:

 (3 credits)

HUM 1020

Humanities:  

(3 credits)

PHI 1100

(Reasoning and Critical Thinking)



Humanities:  

(3 credits)

XXX XXXX

(Prefix & Number to be determined by Common Course Numbering System)

Training of faculty to meet SACS criteria will be required.

Humanities:  

(3 credits)

XXX XXXX

(Prefix & Number to be determined by Common Course Numbering System)

Humanities:  

(3 credits)

XXX XXXX

(Prefix & Number to be determined by Common Course Numbering System)

OCCUPATIONAL CORE
1996-97

OCCUPATIONAL
TASK FORCE
AAC
RECOMMENDATIONS
ISSUES

PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL
RECOMMENDATIONS

BOARD
APPROVED
REQUIREMENTS

Behavioral/Social Science:

(6 credits)

 

ISS 1120

   and

PSY 1000

    or

HLP 1081

 

 

Behavioral/Social Science:

(3 credits)

 

PPE 2001



Behavioral/Social Science:

 

(3 credits)

 

PPE 2001

 

Behavioral/Social Science:

(3 credits)

 

PPE 2001

Behavioral/Social Science:

(3 credits)

 

PPE 2001

 

OCCUPATIONAL CORE
1996-97

OCCUPATIONAL
TASK FORCE
AAC
RECOMMENDATIONS
ISSUES

PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL
RECOMMENDATIONS

BOARD
APPROVED
REQUIREMENTS

Science/Math:

(6 credits)

 

PSC 1515 

and 3 credit math course

Science/Math:

(3 credits)
Any college level math or natural science course which transfers: 

Math: MAC, MAP, MAS, MGF, STA, QMB, MTB 

or

Science: AST, BOT, BSC, CHM, GLY, HUN, MCB, MET, OCB, OCE, PSC, PHY, ZOO



Science/Math:

(3 credits)
Any college level math or natural science course which transfers: 

Math: MAC, MAP, MAS, MGF, STA, QMB, MTB 

or

Science: AST, BOT, BSC, CHM, GLY, HUN, MCB, MET, OCB, OCE, PSC, PHY, ZOO




 

Science/Math:

(3 credits)
An
y college level math or natural science course which transfers: 

Math: MAC, MAP, MAS, MGF, STA, QMB, MTB 

or

Science: AST, BOT, BSC, CHM, GLY, HUN, MCB, MET, OCB, OCE, PSC, PHY, ZOO

 

Science/Math:

(3 credits)
An
y college level math or natural science course which transfers: 

Math: MAC, MAP, MAS, MGF, STA, QMB, MTB 

or

Science: AST, BOT, BSC, CHM, GLY, HUN, MCB, MET, OCB, OCE, PSC, PHY, ZOO

OCCUPATIONAL CORE
1996-97

OCCUPATIONAL
TASK FORCE
AAC
RECOMMENDATIONS
ISSUES

PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL
RECOMMENDATIONS

BOARD
APPROVED
REQUIREMENTS

Computing:

No competency

Computing:

Competency Test

By 16th credit

Computing:

Competency Test

By 31st credit

 

Computing:

Competency Test

By 31st credit

 

 

Computing:

Competency Test

By 31st credit



T A B L E 3

EDUCATION REVIEW
TRANSFER GE 1996-97

TRANSFER TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS

AAC
RECOMMENDATIONS

ISSUES
PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL
RECOMMENDATIONS

Communications: 
(9 credits)

ENC 1101 & 1102

ENC 2301 or Substitutes
(any ENC, LIT, AML, ENL)








Communications: 
(6 credits)

ENC 1101, 1102

{Gordon Rule, 8000 words each}

Oral Competency included in ENC 1101 and 1102

Communications: 
(6 credits)

ENC 1101, 1102

{Gordon Rule, 6000 words each}

(Amendment: Reduced
from 8000 to 6000 words)

Oral Competency deleted from ENC 1101 and 1102

1. Major focus for ENC 1101 & 1102 should be writing

 

2. Some students need additional prep for CLAST



Communications:
 (6 credits)


ENC 1101, 1102

{Gordon Rule, 8000 words each}

ENC XXXX

(Advanced Communication Skills)

Required for students who do not pass CLAST

TRANSFER GE 1996-97

TRANSFER TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS

AAC
RECOMMENDATIONS

ISSUES
PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL
RECOMMENDATIONS

Oral Communications:
Included in ENC 1101

















Oral Communications
Included in ENC 1101 & 1102

Oral Communications

(3 credits)

SPC XXXX (3 credits)

(Amendment: Addition)

1. Depending on major students need more flexibility to meet this requirement.


2. Insufficient credentialed faculty.


3. Oral Communications

skills are important for students preparing for transfer.

Oral Communications

(3 credits)

Select one:

ENC XXXX

LIT XXXX

SPC XXXX

{Gordon Rule, 6000 words in ENC XXXX, 4000 words in LIT XXXX and SPC XXXX}

TRANSFER GE 1996-97

TRANSFER TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS

AAC
RECOMMENDATIONS

ISSUES
PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL
RECOMMENDATIONS

Humanities:  

(6 credits)
HUM 1020 Required

 

3 credits Humanities Distribution:

ARC 2701, 2702, ARH 1000, 2050, 2051, DAN 2111, SPN 2720, LIT 2120,

MUH 2111, MUH 2112,

MUL 1010, PHI 2010,

2600, 2700, SPA 2382C,

2383C, THE 2000, CHI,

FRE, FRW (except 2930),

GER, HBR, ITA, JPN, POR,

RUS, SPN (except 2440),

SPW. If a foreign language course is used

to satisfy this requirement, it must be at the 2000 level or higher.

Humanities:

 (6 credits)

HUM 1020 Recommended

 

3 credits Humanities Distribution:

ARC 2701, 2702, ARH 1000, 2050, 2051, DAN 2111, SPN 2720, LIT 2120, MUH 2111, MUH 2112, MUL 1010, PHI 2010,

2600, 2700, SPA 2382C, 2383C, THE 2000, CHI, FRE, FRW (except 2930),

GER, HBR, ITA, JPN, POR, RUS, SPN (except 2440), SPW. If a foreign language course is used to satisfy this

requirement, it must be at the 2000 level or higher.





Humanities:

 (6 credits)

*Humanities Group

HUM 1020 Recommended

(Amendment: Gordon Rule added)



3 credits Humanities Distribution:

ARC 2701, 2702, ARH 1000, 2050, 2051, DAN 2111, SPN 2720, 

LIT 2120, MUH 2111, MUH 2112, MUL 1010, PHI 2010, 2600, 2700,

SPA 2382C, 2383C, THE 2000, CHI, FRE, FRW (except 2930), GER, HBR, ITA, JPN, POR, RUS, SPN (except 2440), SPW. If a foreign language course is used to satisfy this requirement, it must be at

the 2000 level or higher.

 

XXX XXXX

(AS Humanities requirement.

Prefix & Number to be determined by Common Course Numbering System)

 


1. Gordon Rule should be attached to a limited list of courses to enable college prep students to meet the requirement while concurrently enrolled in college prep.

2. Too much flexibility is provided so that the concept of a core is lost.


3. Review HUM 1020 to address issues of transferability.

Humanities: 

(6 credits)

3 credits from Group A:

ARH 1000

HUM 1020

MUL 1010

XXX XXXX (Reasoning/Critical Thinking/Ethics)


3 credits from Group B:

ARH, LIT, MUH, PHI,

THE

{Gordon Rule assigned to

Group B: 2000 words}



TRANSFER GE 1996-97

TRANSFER TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS

AAC
RECOMMENDATIONS

ISSUES
PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL
RECOMMENDATIONS

Behavioral/Social Science:

(9 credits)

 

ISS 1120 Required

PSY 1000 Required

 

3 credits Social Science:

AMH 2010, ANT 2410,

DEP 2000, ECO 2013,

GEA 2030, 2040, 

GEO 2420,INR 2002,

PCO 2731, POS 2041, 2112,

PPE 2001, PSY 2012,

SYG 2000, 2230,

WOH 2012, 2022.



Behavioral/Social Science:

(6 credits)

 

*Historical/Sociopolitical Foundations

(3 credits)

ISS 1120 Recommended

 

AMH 2010, AMH 2020,

GEA 2030, GEA 2040,

ISS 1120, POS 2041,

POS 2112, SYG 2000 and

SYG 2010.

 

*Psychological Foundations (3 credits)

PPE 2001 Recommended

 

DEP 2000, PCO 2731,

PPE 2001, PSY 2012 and

SOP 2002.



Behavioral/Social Science:

(6 credits)

 

*Historical/Sociopolitical Foundations

(3 credits)

ISS 1120 Recommended

 

(Amendment: Gordon

Rule added)

AMH 2010, AMH 2020,

GEA 2030, GEA 2040,

ISS 1120, POS 2041,

POS 2112, SYG 2000,

SYG 2010, ANT 2410,

ANT 2511, WOH 2012,

WOH 2022, GEO 2420,

INR 2002, ECO 2013.

 

*Psychological Foundations (3 credits)

PPE 2001 Recommended

 

(Amendment: Gordon Rule added)

DEP 2000, PCO 2731,

PPE 2001, PSY 2012 and

SOP 2002.

 

 

 

1. Gordon Rule should be attached to a limited list of courses to enable college

prep students to meet the requirement while concurrently enrolled in college prep.

 

2. Too much flexibility is provided so that the concept of a core is lost.

 

3. Review ISS 1120 to address issues of transferability.

Behavioral/Social Science:

(6 credits)


3 credits from Group A:

PPE 1001

DEP 2000

PSY 2012

 

3 credits from Group B:

ISS 1120

AMH 2020

ANT 2410

ECO 2013

SYG 2010

WOH 2022

 

{Gordon Rule assigned to 2000 level courses in Group A & Group B: 2000 words}

TRANSFER GE 1996-97

TRANSFER TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS

AAC
RECOMMENDATIONS

ISSUES
PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL
RECOMMENDATIONS

Cross-Cultural:

No Competency

Cross-Cultural:

 (3 credits)

ANT 2140, ECO 2013, EDG 2701, GEO 2420, INR 2002, LIT 2120, SGY 2230,

WOH 2012 or WOH 2022

Cross-Cultural:

Deleted -- added to electives

1. Cross Cultural issues are important.

2. Cross Cultural courses should be highlighted under electives to encourage exposure and flexibility.

 

 

 

 

TRANSFER GE 1996-97

TRANSFER TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS

AAC
RECOMMENDATIONS

ISSUES
PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL
RECOMMENDATIONS

Natural Science:

(6 credits)

PSC 1515

3 credits Natural Science Distribution:

AST 1002, BSC 1005,

GLY 1001, 1006, 1010,

HUN 1201, MET 1010,

2741, OCE 1001, PSC 1121.

(Except majors in one of

the Natural Sciences, Architecture, Engineering, Nursing, and Allied Health Programs who should select from the following:

BOT 1010, CHM 1033,

CHM 1040, CHM 1045,

CHM 2032, PHY 2048,

PHY 2053, ZOO 1010.)

or

Students who have met the

following criteria may have

PSC 1515 waived:

 

A. Complete one of the following sequences with labs:

1) CHM 1045, 1045L, 1046L or

2) CHM 1040,1040L, 1041, 1041L, 1046, 1046L or

3) CHM 2032, 2032L, 2205, 2205L.

4) PHY 2048, 2048L, 2049, 2049L.

5) PHY 2053, 2053L, 2054, 2054L.

6) BSC 2010, 2010L, 2011, 2011L.

7) BSC 2085, 2085L, 2086, 2086L.

 

B. Receive a "C" grade or better in each of the natural science sequence courses taken to meet

this requirement.

 

C. Completion of a sequence with a grade of "C" or better will substitute for the PSC 1515 requirement and meet the natural distribution requirement.

 

 

Natural Science:

(6 credits)

Natural Science Group

 

PSC 1515 Recommended

 

Any 6 credits from:

AST, BSC, BOT, CHM,

GLY, HUN, MET, OCE,

PHY, PSC, ZOO

Natural Science:

(6 credits)

Natural Science Group

 

PSC 1515 Recommended


Any 6 credits from:

AST, BSC, BOT, CHM,

GLY, HUN, MET, OCE,

PHY, PSC, ZOO

1. Review PSC 1515 to address issues of transferability.

Natural Science:

(6 credits)

Natural Science Group

 

Any 6 credits from:

AST, BSC, BOT, CHM,

GLY, MET, OCE,

PHY, PSC, ZOO

TRANSFER GE 1996-97

TRANSFER TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS

AAC
RECOMMENDATIONS

ISSUES
PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL
RECOMMENDATIONS

Math: 

(6 credits)

Mathematics-A

(Select 3 credits)

 

Any MAC (except 1253),

MAP, MAS, QMB 2100

(suggested for Business majors only) 

or

STA 2014.

 

Mathematics-B

(Select 3 credits)

 

MGF 1113 or MGF 2202

or

MAD 2104.

 

 

Math:

(6 credits)

Math Group (6 credits)


Any 6 credits from:

MAC, MAP,MAS, MGF,

(except labs), QMB 2100,

STA 2023

Math: 

(6 credits)

Math Group (6 credits)


Any 6 credits from:

MAC, MAP,MAS, MGF,

(except labs), QMB 2100,

STA 2023

NONE

Math: 

(6 credits)

Math Group (6 credits)


Any 6 credits from:

MAC, MAP, MAS, MGF,

(except labs), QMB 2100,

STA 2023

TRANSFER GE 1996-97

TRANSFER TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS

AAC
RECOMMENDATIONS

ISSUES
PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL
RECOMMENDATIONS

Electives:

NONE



Electives:  

(3 credits):

1 to 3 credits selected from any approved general education course

 

1 to 3 credits selected from any science laboratory course linked with a general education natural science

 

CGS 1 credit

CGS 3 credits

 

HLP 1 credit

HLP 3 credits

 

Library Research 1 credit SPC 3 credits















Electives:  

(3 credits):

Cross-Cultural Studies**

(Amendment: Added)

**ANT 2410, ECO 2013,

EDG 2701, GEO 2420,

INR 2002, LIT 2120,

SYG 2230, WOH 2012,

WOH 2022

1 to 3 credits selected from any approved general education course

 

1 to 3 credits selected from any science laboratory course linked with a general education natural science

 

CGS 1 credit

CGS 3 credits

 

HLP 1 credit

HLP 3 credits

 

Any 3 credit introductory course in a major field that satisfies statewide general education requirements (Amendment: Added)

Library Research 1 credit

 

 



Electives:  

(3 credits):

 

Cross-Cultural Studies**

(Amendment: Added)

**ANT 2410, ECO 2013,

EDG 2701, GEO 2420,

INR 2002, LIT 2120,

SYG 2230, WOH 2012,

WOH 2022

 

Any approved general education course previously listed

 

1 to 3 credits selected from any science laboratory course linked with a general education natural science

 

Computer Science

1 to 3 credit CGS

 

Health - Wellness

1 to 3 credit HLP

 

Any 3 credit introductory course in a major field that satisfies statewide general education requirements

Foreign Languages at the

2000 level:

CHI, PRE, GER, HBR, ITA,

JPA, POR, RUS, SPN

(except 2440, SPA 2382C,

SPA 2383C)

 

TRANSFER GE 1996-97

TRANSFER TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS

AAC
RECOMMENDATIONS

ISSUES
PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL
RECOMMENDATIONS

Computer:

No Competency

Computer:
Competency Test/Course
by 30th credit


Computer:

Competency Test/Course by 31st credit

 

Computer:

Competency Test/Course by 31st credit